Today In History: January 27th, 1945. The Liberation of Auschwitz

To commemorate this day, I thought I’d put up some footage shot some months after the liberation, when Auschwitz I was being used as a hospital for the treatment of many of the more than 7,000 prisoners the Nazis left behind because they were too sick to travel on the death march to Bergen-Belsen. (These… Continue reading Today In History: January 27th, 1945. The Liberation of Auschwitz

Expelled Nazis Can Still Collect Social Security Benefits

An AP investigation revealed that former SS camp guards, missile engineers, and collaborators continued to receive payments after fleeing or being deported from the U.S. Why? Apparently the Justice Department used it as a carrot to entice these Nazis to leave the U.S. without a fuss. From AP. The deals allowed the Justice Department’s former Nazi-hunting unit, the Office… Continue reading Expelled Nazis Can Still Collect Social Security Benefits

Moringen Concentration Camp

  While Dachau was the most famous of Germany’s concentration camps–its name became synecdoche for the entire camp system–many others sprang up during the 1930s. One that was important in Summer of Long Knives was the Moringen Concentration Camp, which housed some 1,300 female prisoners from 1933 to 1938. It was here that Anika Wagner’s girlfriend… Continue reading Moringen Concentration Camp

From Kripo to SiPo, the Nazification of German Detectives

The Kriminalpolitzei, known as Kripo, was the German equivalent of the British CID. It began in Prussia in the 1790s with six plainclothes detectives tasked to investigate serious crimes. Over the 19th century, the Kripo expanded until all major cities in Germany had a branch. While the Kripo had units tasked to investigate political crimes, Kripo detectives… Continue reading From Kripo to SiPo, the Nazification of German Detectives

Philipp Bouhler, Hitler’s Mailman

In the news yesterday was a story about a bell still in active use in Austria that was dedicated to Adolf Hitler. A rare find today, such things were common during the Third Reich, when towns all through Germany and Austria sent requests in to Hitler’s private chancellery for him to lend his name to… Continue reading Philipp Bouhler, Hitler’s Mailman

Denialism Chronicles: The Strange Case of Charles Krafft

Blogging’s been light recently because I’ve been wrapping up applications for fellowships for the now-seriously-it’s-ready-but-wait-let-me-change-one-last-thing Denial screenplay. But this story about the apparently well-regarded ceramic artist Charles Krafft in The Stranger drew my interest because it touches on the same subject matter as my script: Krafft, who is 65, has always had an edge to him, and it’s… Continue reading Denialism Chronicles: The Strange Case of Charles Krafft